The Most Cost-EffectiveWay To Build A Ministry . . . .

 

cost effective 1

In January I finished teaching another university class in “Public Speaking”.  I have been teaching a few “one-month modules” of “Public Speaking – 1017” per year, over the past three years at Keiser University.

What I continually notice in a public speaking class is that those who are really good at getting up in front of an audience, having some stage presence, and putting together a fairly successful speech become the emergent leaders of the class.

As I repeatedly challenge the students about to the role of public address in life, I make the point that it will be their public speaking skills which will give them leadership opportunities.

If an individual is called upon to give a presentation, whether it be for a peer group of fellow workers, for a workshop, seminar, or group event, if he or she is “successful” they will emerge as a potential leader.

People follow other people who are interesting and effective at standing before a group of people and communicate well!  If an individual is awkward, stumbling, not very coherent, and/or marked by repeated and annoying “vocalized pauses,” there are few listeners who will entertain the idea that this individual ought to be our leader.

What some pastors may not realize is that it will be their ability to speak which will either create or strengthen their leadership position within the local church setting.  Preachers-teachers-speakers who are . . . .

  • engaging
  • coherent
  • interesting
  • clear
  • easy to listen to
  • provocative
  • easy to watch
  • and even captivating

. . . . will become an emerging and ever-increasing accepted leader.

 

One of the most effective strategies for church growth is public speaking.

 

This becomes more obvious when another pastor is hired on staff, who is a better (real or perceive) speaker-communicator.  It is out of this reality that staff jealousy begins to develop, fester, and even divide (“I am of Paul –  I am of Apollos-ism”).  Without getting into a discussion of that reality, it demonstrates that speaking ability impacts listeners.

Any pastor who is not working on developing their speaking abilities and skills is making a grave error.

It is as any “serial speaker” WORKS at effective communication that people will continue to and increasingly want to follow.

It is as a “serial audience” is repeatedly mentally engaged by an effective communication that people will continue to return and follow.

It is as a pastor-preacher is an effective communicator that those already attending find a reason to and find confidence in asking others to attend.  Knowing that the pastor is probably going to be unappealing — or worse (embarrassing and/or offensive) — does not motivate people to invite others to the misery.

It is as a speaker hones his skills that a church will grow.  He will attract others — lost and saved — who want to listen.  A growing church is not pastored by a speaker who is mediocre or worse.  If your church is not growing, it may speak to your speaking skills.

 

Pastor: A person who lives, moves, and has his being in the world of words. 

The ability to communicate biblical truth in a meaningful way to an audience is very powerful!

It may also be the most, cost-effective way to build an effective church ministry!

 

If you don’t believe that, listen to any of these messages by . . . .

Tony Evans

Crawford Loritts

Alistair Begg

. . . . and say, “They are NOT speakers to whom I would go and listen to every week, and twice on Sunday (which would be unique for most Sundays and for many pastors).

 

 

 

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