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driving a golf ball  Driving A Quotation

 

As previously stated, there are different kinds of & ways to illustrate an idea or a point:

♦ Anecdotes
♦ Personal Stories / Testimonies
Historical Examples
The Stories Or Testimonies Of Others
♦ Pithy Quotations
♦ Well-known Prose & Poems
♦ Biblical Analogies 
♦ Books / Magazine Articles
♦ Metaphors 

Analogies

♦ Stacking Biblical Examples

♦ Hypothetical Analogies

 

Here is a template for building the weight of a quotation.

What you are doing is not merely citing the quotation.  That is what many speakers do and miss the opportunity to drive the quotation.

Rather than just begin with the quotation,  give significance, weight, force, importance, gravity to it.  Hold off using the quotation, and build some muscle into it before you use it.

An Aside: In fact, you can build a “Big Idea” with the quotation once you invest the point of the quotation” with meaning.***

 

Investing Weight Into A Quotation:

We are using a quotation from an individual that is probably unknown — at least to an American audience.

However, even if the person is known you can make the quotation heavy – brawny – muscular!

Even if the selected quotation was by Michael Jordan or Charles Barkley — build some compelling weight into the quotation!  You can “drive” the quotation!

 

DRIVING
The Quotation!

 

A Five-Step Methodology:

#1) State The Person’s Name (and pause):

“Liddell Hart”

#2) Address Familiarity: 

“That name is not well known to those of us who do not travel in the world of military strategy.”
           (Conversely: “That name is probably known around the world.”)

#3) Highlight The Most Significant Details Of His/Her Prominence:
(Include as much as you think necessary)

His thoughts, words, and works form the foundation of the military theory taught at Military Academies across America . . . . at West Point, at Annapolis, at The Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs . . . . and also around the world.

Liddell Hart stands as one of the great 20th-century military historians and theorist* alongside Carl Von Clausewitz — who is probably the grand master.

John F. Kennedy called Liddell Hart “the Captain who teaches Generals.”

“The Clausewitz of the 20th century” — states Alex Danchey in his book, On Art and War and Terror (pg. 77)

Liddell Hart had the unique privilege of interviewing a great number of German generals and military leaders of the German army after WWII.

In his book, “The German Generals Talk,” also titled “The Other Side Of The Hill”** — he states . . . .

“When the late war ended, I was fortunate in having an early opportunity of exploring the “other side of the hill [which] brought me into contact with the German generals and admirals over a lengthy period.  In the course of many discussion with them, I was able to gather their evidence on the events of the war before memories had begun to fade or become increasingly coloured by after thoughts.”

“After years of historical research, drafting and developing military theory for the 20th century, and devoting his professional life to examining strategy and tactics. . . . What does Liddell Hart have to say about fighting and winning battles?
                                    [Hold Off The Quotation A Little Longer]

#4) Establish Its Pertinence To Living The Christian Life:
(its aptness – suitability – bearing on the sermon)

•  Our enemy is no less real because he cannot be seen with our eyes.

•  Spiritual battles are just as real!

•  Satan is called our #1 enemy!

•  The Scriptures speak to strategy and tactics in our warfare — resist, cast down every thought, stand, hold fast, our warfare, endure hardness.

•  We may employ different terminology — theological terminology — but the reasoning, the logic in the fight is no different.

•  In Old Testament days, there were real physical battles– which were written for our admonition!

•  II Corinthians 2:11 — We are told not to be ignorant of his devices.

•  Revelation 12:9 — Satan is the deceiver of the whole world

#5) Site The Quotation & Drive The Point:

Now . . . . .  Here is what Liddell Hart says . . . .

Number Four — of his seven principles of strategy and tactics . . . . .
(You can use any of the 8 points or quotations included below)

“Exploit the line of least resistance — so long as it can lead you to any objective which would contribute to your underlying object.”

 

(Drive The Point)

You see — as I stated — that the reasoning — the logic – the thinking in actual warfare is no different than what Satan does in our lives.

That is why what Hebrews 12 states — “the sin which so easily besets us” — a sin which finds little resistance and therefore we find it plaguing our lives over and over.

Satan understands temptation and our sinfulness and he exploits the line of least resistance.

That is why Samson found himself blind and bound.

Solomon multiplied wives — because Satan exploited that area of his life.

. . . . . . . .

========================

Here are all the pieces put together . . . . .

“Liddell Hart”

“That name is not well known to those of us who do not travel in the world of military strategy.”

His thoughts, words, and works form the foundation of the military theory taught at Military Academies here and abroad — at West Point, Annapolis, and The Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs.

Liddell stands as one of the great 20th-century military historians and theorist alongside Carl Von Clausewitz — who is probably the grand master.

John F. Kennedy called Liddell Hart “the Captain who teaches Generals.”

“The Clausewitz of the 20th century” — states Alex Danchey in his book, On Art and War and Terror (pg. 77)

He had the unique privilege of interviewing a great number of German generals and military leaders of the German army after WWII. In his book, “The German Generals Talk,” also titled “The Other Side Of The Hill” — he states . . . .

“When the late war ended, I was fortunate in having an early opportunity of exploring the “other side of the hill [which] brought me into contact with the German generals and admirals over a lengthy period.  In the course of many discussion with them, I was able to gather their evidence on the events of the war before memories had begun to fade or become increasingly coloured by after thoughts.”

“After years of historical research, drafting and developing military theory for the 20th century, and devoting his professional life to examining strategy and tactics. . . .

•  Our enemy is no less real because he cannot be seen with our eyes. Spiritual battles are just as real!

•  Satan is called our #1 enemy!

•  The Scriptures speak to strategy and tactics in our warfare — resist, cast down every thought, stand, hold fast, our warfare, endure hardness.

•  We may employ different terminology — theological terminology — but the reasoning, the logic in the fight is no different.

•  In Old Testament days, there were real physical battles– which were written for our admonition!

•  II Corinthians 2:11 — We are told not to be ignorant of his devices.

•  Revelation 12:9 — Satan is the deceiver of the whole world

Now . . . . .  here is what Liddell Hart says . . . .

#4  — of his seven principles of strategy and tactics . . . . .

“Exploit the line of least resistance — so long as it can lead you to any objective which would contribute to your underlying object.”

You see — as I stated — that the reasoning — the logic — the thinking in actual warfare is no different than what Satan does in our lives.

That is why what Hebrews 12 states — “the sin which so easily besets us” — a sin which finds little resistance and therefore we find it plaguing our lives over and over.

Satan understands temptation and our sinfulness and he exploits the line of least resistance.

That is why Samson found himself blind and bound.

Solomon multiplied wives — because Satan exploited that area of his life.

. . . . . . . .

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
More Information & Details:
B. H. Liddell Hart 1
  • Born January 29, 1895
  • Son of a Methodist minister
  • Volunteered to serve during WWI in the British army
  • Fought in the Battle of Somme . 2

Battle of Somme: A British and French Offensive move against the German Army

•  The Somme Offensive was the largest battle of WWI — 3 million men fought and 1 million were killed or wounded
•  Traditional methodology — Trench Warfare
•  First battle to be fought with tanks
•  His battalion was almost decimated on the first day of this military offensive — 60,000 casualties — the single biggest casualty in British history
  • Authored books on military drill and training after WWI
  • Authored approximately 30 books relating to military thinking and strategy.
  • Retired from the British army in 1927
  • Writer and newspaper reporter on the sport of Tennis3
  • One of the great* military strategist of the 20th century — “Strategy” — 1954 4
“The revolutions in technology which helped define the Frist and especially SecondWorldWars, along with the destruction they wrought, spoke to the need for a new strategic framework. . . . . In fact, airpower now offered the opportunity to strike at economic and moral centers without destroying the enemy in the field. Mechanized warfare, meanwhile, could not only make direct attacks, but it could also help induce the collapse of an enemy without a major battle “by cutting their supply lines, dislocating their control-system, or producing paralysis by the sheer nerve-shock of deep penetration into their rear” (Liddell Hart 1967, 358). Each of these would come to represent aspects of the indirect approach. 5
  • Lidell Hart’s book Strategy was his answer to this challenge.”

     

  • Hart wrote the definite work on the military strategy of Hitler’s German Military — “The German Generals Talk” (a great historical read!)

     

  • In chapter 20 of “Strategy” — “The Concentrated Essence Of Strategy and Tactics” — the following seven principles are made by Liddell.
1. Adjust your end to your means
2. Keep your object always in your mind while adapting your plan to circumstances.
3. Chose the line (of course) of least expectation.
4. Exploit the line of least resistance — so long as it can lead you to any objective which would contribute to your underlying object.
5. Take a line of operation which offers alternate objectives.
6. Ensure that both plan and dispositions are flexible-adaptable to circumstances
7. Do not throw your weight into a strike whilst your opponent is on guard.
8. Do not renew an attack along the same line (or in the same form) after it has once failed. A mere reinforcement of weight is not sufficient change, for it is probable that the enemy also will have strengthened himself in the interval.” — 6
In Liddell’s Own Words:
“The most dangerous error is failure to recognize our own tendency to error.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“The downfall of civilized states tends to come not from the direct assaults of foes, but from internal decay combined with the consequences of exhaustion in war.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“In strategy the longest way round is often the shortest way there- a direct approach to the object exhausts the attacker and hardens the resistance by compression, whereas an indirect approach loosens the defender’s hold by upsetting his balance.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“Air Power is, above all, a psychological weapon – and only short-sighted soldiers, too battle-minded, underrate the importance of psychological factors in war.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“The profoundest truth of war is that the issue of battle is usually decided in the minds of the opposing commanders, not in the bodies of their men.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“I used to think that the causes of war were predominantly economic. I came to think that they were more psychological. I am now coming to think that they are decisively “personal,” arising from the defects and ambitions of those who have the power to influence the currents of nations.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“Avoid self-righteousness like the devil- nothing is so self-blinding.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“Loss of hope rather than loss of life is what decides the issues of war. But helplessness induces hopelessness.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“While the nominal strength of a country is represented by its numbers and resources, this muscular development is dependent on the state of its internal organs and nerve-system – upon its stability of control, morale, and supply.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“Every action is seen to fall into one of three main categories, guarding, hitting, or moving. Here, then, are the elements of combat, whether in war or pugilism.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“The unexpected cannot guarantee success, but it guarantees the best chance of success.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“A commander should have a profound understanding of human nature, the knack of smoothing out troubles, the power of winning affection while communicating energy, and the capacity for ruthless determination where required by circumstances. He needs to generate an electrifying current, and to keep a cool head in applying it.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“In reality, it is more fruitful to wound than to kill. While the dead man lies still, counting only one man less, the wounded man is a progressive drain upon his side.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart
“If you find your opponent in a strong position costly to force, you should leave him a line of retreat as the quickest way of loosening his resistance. It should, equally, be a principle of policy, especially in war, to provide your opponent with a ladder by which he can climb down.” ~ B. H. Liddell Hart


Other Information & Links:
3. Covered Wimbledon and wrote — “The Lawn Tennis Masters Unveiled”
4. Karl Von Clausewitz was the 19th centuries renown, military thinker. Both Clausewitz and Hart are read by military theorists today.
“Strategy — pg. 335-336
Brian Bond: “Liddell Hart: A study of his military thought” (Modern Revivals in Military History) – 1977
*At the height of his popularity, John F. Kennedy called Liddell Hart “the Captain who teaches Generals” and was using his writings to attack the Eisenhower administration, which he said was too dependent on nuclear arms.
His influence extended to armies outside England and the US as well. Baumgarten says of Liddell Hart’s influence in the Australian Army: “The indirect approach was also one of the key influences on the development of manoeuvre theory, a dominant element in Army thinking throughout the 1990s.”
Retired Pakistani General Shaafat Shah called Liddell Hart’s book Strategy: the Indirect Approach “A seminal work of military history and theory”.
In the book Science, Strategy and War, Netherlander Frans Osinga mentions, while speaking of John Boyd, “In his recently published study of modern strategic theory, Colin Gray ranked Boyd among the outstanding general theorists of strategy of the 20th century, along with the likes of Bernard Brodie, Edward Luttwak, Basil Liddell Hart and John Wylie.”
His biographer, Alex Danchev, noted that his books were still being translated all around the world, some of them seventy years after they had been written.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B._H._Liddell_Hart

 

*“On the Other Side of the Hill” by Liddell Hart

 

*** In our original quotation the “Big Idea” would be something like . . . . .

“The area of least resistance in your life
will be the area of repeated attack and failure”

or

Point to the area of least resistance
and I will tell you where the attack is coming.

or

No Resistance Equals The
Location of The Attack

 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

An Aside: The alternate title of “Strategy” is “On The Other Side Of The Hill” By Liddell Hart — An interesting title which can also be used for an introduction, point, conclusion, Big Idea, etc.  Military strategy is about trying to figure out what is on the other side of the hill.  

i.e. Big Idea:  “You see, in the Christian life, and in life in general, you cannot see what is “On the other side of the hill!”

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