Today’s Illustration: Long Runways & Hot Brakes!

flight 431 miamiWhen:  1:45 p.m. on August 31, 2006

What: Airplane Accident & Emergency Landing due to two tires blowing on landing and resultant fire.

Where: Miami, Florida

Who: 118 passengers and drew

“MIAMI, Florida (CNN) — All 118 passengers and crew were evacuated safely Thursday when a fire broke out in the left wheel well of US Airways Flight 431, officials said.

Firefighters using foam quickly extinguished the fire, which was sparked when two tires blew as the Boeing 737 landed at 1:45 p.m., Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said.

Airport operations supervisor Ike Wetherill said the 113 passengers and five crew aboard used emergency slides to get out of the jetliner, and no one was hurt.

The flight, which originated in Albany, New York, was arriving [in Miami] from Charlotte, North Carolina.

“The plane did not have a problem until it got on the ground,” Wetherill said. “Two-thirds of the way down the runway, it appeared to have a problem. It did blow tires and there was some flash of fire.”

The plane stopped safely at the end of the runway which, at 13,000 feet, is the longest of the airport’s four runways.”

    • “On August 31, 2006, US Airways Flight 431 from Charlotte caught fire on the runway. All 118 passengers and crew on board were evacuated safely and there were no injuries. The fire occurred in the left wheel well of the 737 after the tires blew upon landing, and was extinguished with foam by firefighters. Passengers have stated that the plane was shaking violently as it landed.”
  • flash fire
  • while landing / arriving
  • no one hurt
  • no problem until
  • stopped safely
  • landed on the longest of four runways
  • long runway

. . . . . .

. . . . . . 

Key Biblical Illustrative Thoughts::

  • anger
  • emotions
  • problems
  • trials
  • fire
  • cooling down
  • tongue is a fire
  • revenge / retaliation
  • David & Naboth
  • jealousy
  • hatred
  • enemies
  • blow out
  • reactions
  • overheated
  • long runways
  • quick decisions
  • dangerously short
  • taking your time
  • prayer & fasting
  • decisions
  • responses
  • thinking
  • the long look

. . . . . . . 

Sermonic Example: This is one of three ways (and the most basic or simple) to use this kind of illustration.

August 31 in 2006, a flight from Albany, New York, to Charlotte, NC, and then was completing its flight by landing in Miami, Florida.  The flight was typical in always.  There was no problem until 1:45 in the afternoon. After the completion of a normal flight, two tires blew as they set down on the runway.  118 passengers and 5 crew members all survived, but not after a great deal of physical shaking and a lot of anxiety and fear.

“There was no problem until” — That is what happens in this biblical account.  There was no problem until . . . . . until Mordecai / Esther / David / Joseph / Job

Isn’t that how it happens in life.  Cruising along, even at high altitudes, and there is no problem until . . . . until there is a problem.

OR . . . .

August 31 in 2006, a flight from Albany, New York, to Charlotte, NC, and then was completing its flight by landing in Miami, Florida.  The flight was typical in always.  There was no problem until 1:45 in the afternoon. After the completion of a normal flight, two tires blew as they set down on the runway.  118 passengers and 5 crew members all survived, but not after a great deal of physical shaking and a lot of anxiety and fear.

Fortunately, one of Miami’s four major runways is 1,300 feet long.  It needed that length to stop since blown tires increase the distance needed to bring the airliner to a safe stop on the runway.

At times “a long runway” or a “longer runway” is needed to bring a difficult situation under control and allow time for the safe resolution of a problem.

David sought the Lord when facing that problem and lengthened the runway by not acting immediately!

Esther lengthened the runway by calling for prayer and fasting, allow the time that God was going to use to address the dangerous situation.

OR . . .
One could also make that phrase (No problem until there is a problem) the BigIdea of a message.

OR . . . .
One could make the phrase “long runways landings” another potential BigIdea

. . . . . . . 



Other Information & Links:

Plane blows tire on takeoff, catches fire
https://abc11.com/united-flight-fire-onboard-houston/1363685/

“May 30, 2016
TAMPA, FL — It was a frightening experience for passengers on a United Airlines flight Monday when a tire blew on takeoff, causing a small fire.

The flight was in Tampa, Florida and headed to Houston, Texas when the incident happened. According to the Tampa airport, all passengers were safely taken off the plane, and crews were able to put out the fire.

♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦

Many pilots believe that after V1, you should take-off regardless of the blown tires.

“Thou shalt not reject after V1. It’s counter-psychological, and that’s why it’s trained so aggressively, but in a go/no-go situation the conservative decision is always to go.  The plane is working with you to do what it was designed to do, instead of trying to go from V1 to zero with a full load of fuel.”

♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦

https://www.arffresource.com/2019/04/19/arff-ready-to-respond-hot-brake-and-wheel-fires-101/. . . . . . . ♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ 

ARFF Ready to Respond—Hot Brake and Wheel Fires 101

How are brakes cooled off

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