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tony evans

That Is Why Some Speakers Are Effective & Some Are . . . . Well Boring!

If you want to see the use and power of analogy, a worthwhile individual to listen to is Tony Evans.  Why is Evans so effective?  The reason is “hidden” in his use of analogy, which is subtle — covert and not overt.

Listen to one of his messages and notice how often analogy is used throughout the message.

Here is an example.  The topic is the importance of having strong fellowship in the local church . . . . Link:  “The Importance of Fellowship”  #2

@ 8:08 — chicken soup / broth

@ 11:06 – husband-wife to church compared fellowship

@13:13 — a ham sandwich

@ 15:23 — extended analogy — game of pool

@25:05 — expanding on the Lord’s analogy – cold water is like an attitude of . . . .

@28:08 — analogy to the eye getting something in it

@31:44 — analogy to a bear trap

@ 34:37 — not a firing squad — rescuers

@ 34:41 — analogy of having had a broken bone and went to the doctor

@38:50 — calls up the biblical analogy

@41:48-44: — extended analogy to a cheerleader

@44:59 – analogy to a game and playing field

@46:27 — extended analogy to beware of dog sign

You may be surprised how often “analogy” is used BECAUSE they are subtle and unidentified by the listener — unless you are looking to identify them!  That is what makes them powerful in a message/argument!

Yes, they are “argumentative.”  They drive the argument and make the point in the listeners’ minds!

The above examples are only the direct analogies and do not include the many passing analogies which call up a simple, quick metaphor or figure of speech — which are also part of analogical “argument.”

No surprise that Tony Evans is effective!



Here is another list of words which are related to each other from my “Dictionary of Related Words.”

Probably should have done it on the game of pool or cheerleading!

Words Related To . . . .

Travel / Transportation

bridge
bus
hand glider
car / truck / bus / van
cargo / freight / load
airplane / flight / airship / jet / glider / helicopter
airport
terminal
train / trolley / subway / freight car / locomotive
chariot / coach / covered wagon
boat / ship / barge / steamer / cruise ship / schooner
horse / dog sled / mule
aviation
18 wheeler
destination
arrive / arrival / imbark
depart / departure / debark
journey / trip / exploration /
flight
stage coach
twenty mule team
portage
canoe
drive
bicycle / cycle / motorcycle / scooter
highway
expressway / highway / byway
guide
motor
horsepower
hot air balloon
miles
gasoline / coal / steam / atomic / oil
motion / movement
lane / path / route
car / jeep / tank
navigate
pedal / walk / drive / coast / cruise
railroad / tracks
river / barge / tugboat / raft
rickshaw / wagon / cart / jitney
rocket / missle / ICBM
sleigh / skis / slide / sled
speed / mph / velocity
suitcase
tire / spare
toll
tow
tractor
tram
sightsee
voyage
wheel
wing
zoom
ferry / tugboat
machine
intinerary
map / route
motion / movement
GPS
run / jaunt / walk / saunter
canal / waterway
tunnel
trailer
hitch hike
canal
crash / accident / collision / iceberg
baggage / cargo / freight / luggage
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— Ted Martens

2 Replies to “The Use of Analogy: Effective-To-Boring — Pt. 4”

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